Last edited by Mukree
Sunday, August 2, 2020 | History

4 edition of Higher education and first-generation students found in the catalog.

Higher education and first-generation students

RashnГ© Rustom Jehangir

Higher education and first-generation students

cultivating community, voice, and place for the new majority

by RashnГ© Rustom Jehangir

  • 346 Want to read
  • 13 Currently reading

Published by Palgrave Macmillan in New York, NY .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references.

StatementRashné Rustom Jehangir
Classifications
LC ClassificationsLC4069.6 .J44 2010
The Physical Object
Paginationp. cm.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL24468190M
ISBN 109780230623446
LC Control Number2010013776

  While white students made up a higher share of first-generation students, Black and Latino students were more likely to be first-generation than to have parents with a bachelor’s degree. Presenting findings obtained from both personal insight and relevant research, higher education practitioners and scholars from across the country detail the characteristics, concerns, and specific needs of each diverse group, to conclude that the success of these new students and the future of Canadian society depends on its post-secondary.

  2. Guiding class consciousness in first-generation college students: a pragmatic approach to classism in the academy / Brandi Lawless Until Mr. Right comes along: social mobility, higher education, and the lure of cultural elitism / JoAnne M. Podis --Section II. Meeting the challenges of first-generation students through academic programs According to the National Center for Education Statistics, some 60 percent of the wealthiest college students will graduate. But only 16 percent of low-income students will do so.

In the past several years, more universities have admitted more students of color and more students from low-income situations, contributing to an already greater number of first-generation students. This higher percentage of first-generation students can often mean more tutoring, more advising, and more mentoring than before.   Net college costs take a bigger percentage of low-income families’ income Since , the net price of higher education for dependent, full-time undergraduates as a percentage of family income has soared for the poorest students, going from 56 percent of family income in to 94 percent in for the lowest income quartile.


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Higher education and first-generation students by RashnГ© Rustom Jehangir Download PDF EPUB FB2

This book provides great insight and interviews with first generation college students. I highly recommend it for student affairs practitioners, faculty members, and administrators in a variety of higher education contexts.5/5(1).

First-generation students (those whose parents lack a college degree) can succeed in higher education, but they need support. Laura Nichols, an associate professor of sociology at Santa Clara University, makes the case in The Journey Before Us: First-Generation Pathways From Middle School to College (Rutgers University Press).

The book is a mix of interviews with students and. More first-generation students are attending college than ever before, and policy makers agree that increasing their participation in higher education is a matter of priority.

Despite this, there is no agreed definition about the term, few institutions can quantify how many first-generation students are enrolled, or mistakenly conflate them /5(4).

Higher Education and First-Generation Students Cultivating Community, Voice, and Place for the New Majority This book is a theoretically informed study of the lived experience of FG students and draws on their voices to demonstrate how their insights interface with what we, as educators, think we know about them.

Keywords. education. was an excellent year for books on higher education. Getty. It’s that time again, where reviewers recommend the year’s best books.

minority and first-generation students from Author: Michael T. Nietzel. Last April at Florida Atlantic University, Ron Oliver became director of a newly created Office of First-Generation Student Success.

About a quarter of the university’s students, or 7,   First-generation Student Success: A Landscape Analysis. Across higher education, engaged communities of university leaders, practitioners, scholars and students are working tirelessly to craft approaches that unlock the vast potential of first-generation students.

Books about First-Generation College Students These texts explore the unique challenges of those students who identify as "first-gen," i.e., those whose parents do not have college degrees.

This list may be particularly helpful for middle or high schoolers who also aspire to be the first to go in their families.

Their paper, which analysed data taken from the latest survey of the cohort inshowed that 27 per cent of the participants had attended university by the age of Two-thirds of these participants were first-in-family students, demonstrating how much higher education has expanded over time, the researchers write.

International students experience multiple and multi-dimensional educational and life transitions: moving to a new country, moving to a new educational system and moving to higher educational degree programmes.

Within these transitions, they experience differences in the social and organisational cultures, languages, and interpersonal expectations, realities and relationships. Their. This list has six books on it, but if you can read only one, read Lisa M.

Nunn’s 33 Simple Strategies for Faculty: A Week-by-Week Resource for Teaching First-Year and First-Generation Students (Rutgers, ). Many of your students will be new to the university setting simply because they are first-year students; others are new to it in a.

Money is one thing, but first-generation students often wrestle with the question of whether they belong in school in the first place. If you want to pursue higher education, you should.

First-generation students can struggle to fit in. Cultural issues are often at play, but so are family issues —. "This is a brilliant, engaging, and well-written book on first-generation, mostly low-income college students, which offers creative suggestions regarding how to reorganize the academy to include learning communities, partnerships between academic divisions and student services, multicultural competence training, and creative pedagogy to make the academy more welcoming and inclusive.".

The number of first generation college students (FGCS) in the United States is higher than many people realize. According to the U.S. Dept. of Education, college students whose parents did not attend college make up approximately % of the student population (% at 2-year institutions and % at four-year institutions).

Adrianna Kezar, a professor of higher education at the University of Southern California, said the barriers facing first-generation students amid the pandemic are exacerbated versions of. While education is proven to be transformative, securing a degree and navigating the institutions that grant them can be fraught for many students, especially first-generation, minority, and low-income students.

Too often higher education institutions utterly fail to meet their students’ actual needs and live up to the ideals they champion. The higher education leaders - presidents, provosts, CIOs and CFOs - who embrace collaboration, stay close to their students, and emphasize competency-based learning are.

New Book Details How Higher Ed Is Failing Low-Income & First-Generation Students a first-generation student and math enthusiast who Tough highlights in his book. higher education.

First-generation students are less prepared to make the most out of their education. The simple assumption is that a higher number of educated first-generation college students will translate to better jobs for these graduates and a better quality of life.

The answer to. (). First-Generation College Students. The Journal of Higher Education: Vol. 75, No. 3, pp. Related: How first-generation students are helping each other through college. Today, about a third of students enrolled in higher education are the first in their families to attend college.

Research suggests that having even one parent who has attended some college can boost student. Read "Higher Education and First-Generation Students Cultivating Community, Voice, and Place for the New Majority" by R. Jehangir available from Rakuten Kobo.

Offers readers a rich understanding of the experience of students who are first in their family to attend college. This Brand: Palgrave Macmillan US."Gail Horowitz’s new book Teaching STEM to First Generation College Students is a timely and important resource to improve the success of college students who come from families with little or no experience in the US higher education system.

“First-gens” are a growing population whose academic success is important to both the institutions.